Nasi Campur

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Nasi Campur

Nasi campur (Indonesian/Malay: “mixed rice”, also called nasi rames in Indonesia) refers to a dish of a scoop of nasi putih (white rice) accompanied by small portions of a number of other dishes, which includes meats, vegetables, peanuts, eggs and fried-shrimp krupuk. Depending where it originates, a nasi campur vendor might served several side dishes, including vegetables, fish and meats. It is a staple meal of the Southeast Asian countries, and popular especially in Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, and southern Thailand, and also the Netherlands through its colonial ties with Indonesia. A similar form called chanpurū exists in Okinawa.

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Nasi putih
Nasi putih

Nasi Campur in Malaysia

Nasi campur is a ubiquitous dish around Malaysia and as diverse as the archipelago itself, with regional variations. There is no exact rule, recipe or definition of what makes a nasi campur, since Indonesians and by large Southeast Asians commonly consume steamed rice surrounded with side dishes consisting of vegetables and meat. As a result, the question of origin or recipe is obscure. Yet nasi campur is commonly perceived as steamed rice surrounded with dishes that might consists of vegetables and meats, served in personal portion, in contrast of tumpeng that served in larger collective portion or Rijsttafel that presented in lavish colonial banquet.

Rijsttafel
Rijsttafel

There are several local variations throughout Southeast Asia: from Java, Bali, Malay Peninsular, Borneo, Sulawesi and Indo colonial to Chinese Indonesian versions of nasi campur. A similar Minangkabau counterpart is called Nasi Padang and prominent especially in Sumatra region.

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